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Wednesday, July 22, 2009

A Directory of Greene County Farmers - 1900: Dawson Township

A Directory of Greene County Farmers - 1900: Dawson Township:
"200 Dawson Twp. 35 Danap. 23

McNulthy, A.488520Dawson Twp22Patonp. 23
Meyer, J. C.374160Dawson Twp18Patonp. 23
Meyer, John43580Dawson Twp9Patonp. 22
Meyers, F. J.43480Dawson Twp_?Churdanp. 23
Meyers, Phillip393310Dawson Twp18Patonp. 23
Miller, A.4610160Dawson Twp30Jeffersonp. 23
Miller, A.……"

Buffalo County, Nebraska, Obituary Extracts, Page 10

While searching online for a reference to a blog I did on family names Cummngs, Rowe, and Meyer; I found this obituary on
Dorothy Rowe Cummings.

I didn't realize it led to Ancestry.com until I came to finish this post.

Buffalo County, Nebraska, Obituary Extracts, Page 10: "Kearney Hub, 6 November, 2003



CUMMINGS, Dorothy O., 75, of Kearney died Thursday, Nov. 6, 2003, at Good Samaritan Hospital
Services: Wednesday at Horner-Lieske-Horner Mortuary
Burial: Kearney Cemetery
Memorials suggested to the church or the nursing scholarship program at Good Samaritan Hospital
Born March 13, 1928, on a farm near Payton, Iowa
Parents: Roscoe and Mabel (Meyer) ROWE
Graduated from Rockwell City High School, 1945; moved to Scottsbluff where she entered nurse's training school at Methodist General Hospital; graduated, 1949
Was employed as a floor supervisor at the hospital and as a private-duty nurse, 1949-1953
Married: Aug. 18, 1950, to Donald Cummings in Scottsbluff
Moved to Atkinson, 1953; to Kearney in 1955
In Kearney, worked as a nurse and surgical nurse at Good Samaritan Hospital; retired in 1979
Activities: had been a den mother for the Cub Scouts; was a member of the Riverbend Christian Fellowship Church in Grand Island, where she sang in the choir, and of the Kearney Country Club
Enjoyed following her children's school and sports activities
Survivors include her husband; sons, Wray and Kim, both of Lincoln, and Jerry of Mons, Belgium; and five grandchildren
Preceded in death by her parents and two brothers
Kearney Hub, 10 November, 2003"

Note: Scotts Bluff is a residence to remember as well. I will link you to the account of the family soon.

jo arootdigger


Sunday, July 19, 2009

German's - Lowlands-L • a discussion group for people who share an interest in languages and cultures of the Lowlands

Maybe you don't realize that the northern part of germany is low in topographics scale. The rivers run north. Maybe this is why the area of north germany is called the Low Lands. I should see if I can find a map that outlines these low lands. I had forgotten that my family and others in this north region by the Elbe river speak " Low German or Platte Dutsch. I am hoping that I reveal this all correct. Recently I googled a few sites to learn more since someone recently as far back as January mentioned that our families of Luneburg regions speak this Low German. I have been using the translators blindly forgetting that little piece of advice.
I am sure you would like to learn more. Clicking my link will bring an adventure to a lot fun and serious reading about the use of Low german.

Lowlands-L • a discussion group for people who share an interest in languages and cultures of the Lowlands: "What are “Lowlands languages and cultures”?
“Lowlands languages” are those Germanic languages that developed in the “Lowlands” the low-lying areas adjacent to the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. These are primarily Dutch, Zeelandic (Zeeuws, West Flemish), Frisian, Limburgish and Low Saxon (Low German). Also included are those languages that descended from autochtonous Lowlands languages and are used elsewhere; for example, Afrikaans, Lowlands-based emigrant languages, pidgins and creoles, and also English and Scots. “Lowlands cultures” are those cultures that utilize Lowlands languages or are clearly derived from such cultures."


jo arootdigger 

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